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8/29/2016

Hogs Wild: Selected Reporting Pieces 
by Ian Frazier, WRA Class of 1969 ~
Frazier is a frequent contributor to 
The New Yorker magazine.

8/25/2016

Books to Give You Hope: 
The Old Man and the Sea 
by Ernest Hemingway

The story of an elderly Cuban fisherman, with little but 
hope to sustain him through a punishing life, 
tells a fundamental truth about life.
Out of luck … 
strong winds batter the shore at Boca de Galafre, Pinar del Rio province, Cuba.

8/15/2016

Recommended Read

Tracy Chevalier makes her first fictional foray into the American past in The Last Runaway, bringing to life the Underground Railroad and illuminating the principles, passions and realities that fueled this extraordinary freedom movement.  [Good Reads]


8/11/2016

Thanks Dan Dyer for sharing this link!

Read Books, Live Longer?

By
NEW YORK TIMES   August 3, 2016 2:05 pm

Reading books is tied to a longer life, according to a new report.

Researchers used data on 3,635 people over 50 participating in a larger health study who had answered questions about reading.

The scientists divided the sample into three groups: those who read no books, those who read books up to three and a half hours a week, and those who read books more than three and a half hours.

The study, in Social Science & Medicine, found that book readers tended to be female, college-educated and in higher income groups.  Researchers controlled for those factors as well as age, race, self-reported health, depression, employment and marital status.
Compared with those who did not read books, those who read for up to three and a half hours a week were 17 percent less likely to die over 12 years of follow-up, and those who read more than that were 23 percent less likely to die. Book readers lived an average of almost two years longer than those who did not read at all.

They found a similar association among those who read newspapers and periodicals, but it was weaker.


“People who report as little as a half-hour a day of book reading had a significant survival advantage over those who did not read,” said the senior author, Becca R. Levy, a professor of epidemiology at Yale. “And the survival advantage remained after adjusting for wealth, education, cognitive ability and many other variables.”

8/10/2016

After the Crash



This title is breaking records for the most read WRA Summer Read.  Thanks Madame!

On the night of 22 December 1980, a plane crashes on the Franco-Swiss border and is engulfed in flames. 168 out of 169 passengers are killed instantly. The miraculous sole survivor is a three-month-old baby girl. Two families, one rich, the other poor, step forward to claim her, sparking an investigation that will last for almost two decades. Is she Lyse-Rose or Emilie? [Good Reads]


Michel Bussi is one of France's most celebrated crime authors. The winner of more than 15 major literary awards, he is a professor of geography at the University of Rouen and a political commentator. After the Crash, his first book to appear in English, will be translated into over twenty languages.